New Embargoed Research Study Show Some Hispanic Women are Less Likely to Survive Breast Cancer Than Others

NEW DATA: AVON FOUNDATION FOR WOMEN FUNDS MOST COMPREHENSIVE BREAST CANCER STUDY UNCOVERING PREVALENCE AND MORTALITY AMONG U.S. HISPANICS AND HISPANIC SUBGROUPS

 

WHO:             The Avon Breast Cancer Crusade, which launched in 1992, has placed Avon and theAvon Foundation for Women at the forefront of the fight against breast cancer. Today, Avon is the leading corporate supporter of the cause globally, donating more than $800 million to breast cancer programs for research and advancing access to care, regardless of a person’s ability to pay. Avon Breast Cancer Crusade hosts its biennial Breast Cancer Forum encouraging industry collaboration to share best practices and disseminate the most recent trends in tackling breast cancer across the continuum of care.

 

WHAT:           Research findings from the Avon Foundation funded study: Breast Cancer Among Hispanic Subgroups in the U.S., conducted by Sinai Urban Health Institute, will be unveiled at this year’s forum. The new data is the first of its kind to examine how mortality rates for Hispanic women with breast cancer vary by subgroups.

 

Key research findings include:

·                     Breast cancer mortality rates differ for Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Central and South American women with breast cancer in the U.S.

·                     Puerto Ricans and Mexicans have the highest breast cancer mortality rates of all Hispanic women with breast cancer in the U.S.

·                     Central and South American women in the U.S. are significantly more likely to survive breast cancer than other Hispanic subgroups observed.

 

The embargoed findings of this new research study will be released at a special press briefing at the Avon Breast Cancer Crusade’s biennial Breast Cancer Forum in Miami. The briefing will feature special guests, including Hispanic breast cancer survivors and the healthcare professionals who are working on the frontlines with these communities every day. Together they will share their experiences and illuminate the unique challenges that Hispanic women face in navigating diagnosis, treatment and care for breast cancer. They will also reinforce the need for continued research and support for programs that strive to improve care and interventions for this population.

 

Press briefing speakers available for interview include:

 

·                           Cheryl Heinonen, Avon Foundation President

·                           Paola Giorello, Hispanic breast cancer survivor

·                           Bijou R. Hunt, Author of the Avon Foundation funded study: Breast Cancer Among Hispanic Subgroups in the U.S., of the Sinai Urban Health Institute at Sinai Health System

·                           Mita Sanghavi Goel, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University

·                           Claudia Campos Galván, MA, PhD candidate, Chief Programs Officer, Nueva Vida, Inc.

WHY:            There are 56.6 million people of Hispanic origin in the U.S., making them the largest racial/ethnic minority in the country1. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Hispanic women, as well as the leading cause of cancer death for this group2. Understanding and addressing this group’s diverse health needs will ultimately impact the overall health of the country. Through the use of multiple national data sources and multiple years of data, this analysis presents data on Hispanic subgroups that are not often accessible.

  

WHEN:           Sept. 8, 2016, Briefing at 12:30 PM (light refreshments to be served)

           

WHERE:         JW Marriott Marquis Miami

255 Biscayne Boulevard Way, Miami, Florida 33131

 

CONTACT:    Kate Yee, 251-406-0920[email protected]

 

 

[1] U.S. Census Bureau. Annual Estimates of the Resident Population by Sex, Age, Race, and Hispanic Origin for the United States and States: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015

 

2 Society. AC. Center Facts & Figures for Hispanics/Latinos 2015-2017. In. Atlanta: 2015.

 

New Embargoed Research Study Show Some Hispanic Women are Less Likely to Survive Breast Cancer Than Others

New Embargoed Research Study Show Some Hispanic Women are Less Likely to Survive Breast Cancer Than Others

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